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The best way to start using SynRad is to set up a simple sytem with two dipoles and interpret results. There is a 10-minute quick start guide to do just that:

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You can also see how eactly the tutorial is solved on this Youtube video (set quality to 720p to see text):

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Recently two MolFlow users have been facing a similar problem:

One of them wanted to simulate outgassing due to beam loss, others had outgassing due to electrons in the system. In both cases, they had a distribution of outgassing that changed depending on the location. The only way to enter it to MolFlow was to create a matrix of facets, and define the outgassing rate one-by-one. A rather long and boring process.
 
So I decided to create a way of defining a spacial outgassing distribution. The key is the Explode command that existed already in Molflow.
 
First, you have to define how fine the outgassing matrix is by defining a regular mesh:
 
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Then we select the facet and issue the new "create outgassing map" command:
 
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Below you see a map of the facet. For each mesh element, you can manually set the outgassing value. Note that the edited cell's location is highlighted on the geometry (similar to texture plotter):
 
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Click image to magnify)
 
You can also paste values from the clipboard from Excel. The values are pasted to the right and bottom from the actual cell. Then you can define the desorption type (Uniform, Cosine, Cosine^N). Finally, if everything's ready, click Explode.
 
The exploded geometry highlights those facets that have a desorption now:
 
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To test that everything was well defined, add a mesh that counts desorbed molecules, and you'll see a nice colormap of the values you just entered:
 
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That wasn't hard, was it? Happy outgassing! ;)
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If you have carefully selected a group of facets, let's say all part of a given structure, then you probably won't want to select them once again.

That's why the Memorize selection function was added, allowing you to create facet groups, which are saved with the geometry file.

To use it, simply select some facets, then use Selection menu / memorize selection (shortcut: CTRL+W), and give your selection a name.

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In the current version of Molflow, it is possible to insert a GEO, TXT or STL file to the current geometry. It is useful if we want to assemble a system from parts that are each represented by a file.

However, snapping the pieces together might be difficult, thus there is a new Facet align option.

To use it, select the object that we want to align.

Then open the Facet align dialog. Upon opening, the selection will be memorized:

 

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You can now select one or more facets, and rotate them by a given number of degrees, around an arbitrary axis:

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If you want to use the "define by 2 selected vertex" mode to define the rotation axis, you will have to select two vertices using the vertex selector tool.

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GEO files can be big. This is partly because they are text files (readable in let's say Notepad), but also because they often contain repetitive information (for example, even a tiny facets with default parameters takes about 20 lines to write).

There is also a problem related to this: sending them by email or sharing over Dropbox might result in the browser interpreting the content (ie. displaying the GEO file as a webpage instead of downloading, the email client putting the file content in the email, etc.).

Good news is, because of this uncompact and repetitive behaviour, they are very well compressible. It is not common to have 2% compression ratio, converting a 100MB GEO file to a 2MB GEO7Z file.

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In the Tools / Global Settings menu, you can find a new option: autosave. You can toggle the frequency in minutes, and it is possible to restrict this to only when simulation is running (and when it is assumed that the file save process doesn't interrupt your work).

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